The global minerals industry is increasingly recognising the need to consider its impact on Indigenous peoples. There is also increasing agreement on the need to address the gender bias against women in the distribution of risks and benefits from mining development. As part of their 'gender action plan', the World Bank has proposed guidelines for extractive industries to ensure that women's concerns and needs are included in project design and preparation. In the realm of employment, greater participation of Indigenous women provides a specific opportunity for individuals and families to benefit from mineral development, yet the experience of Indigenous women working in the mining industry remains largely unexamined in the empirical literature, particularly in Australia. This article begins to fill this knowledge gap, by presenting recent research conducted at a northern Australian mine. It argues that the Australian mining industry is at risk of rendering the needs of Indigenous women invisible, by failing to consider the intersection between race and gender, and that understanding the experience of mining employment for Indigenous women is crucial in creating long-term positive outcomes for Indigenous communities.

Publisher: Women in Mining 2008

CITATION

Parmenter, J. 2008. Considering the experience of Indigenous women working in the Australian mining industry. Gender and Mining 2008.

Considering the experience of Indigenous women working in the Australian mining industry
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Considering the experience of Indigenous women working in the Australian mining industry