Traditionally, the community involvement of most Australian mining companies was largely unplanned or, in the case of purpose built towns associated with new operations in remote areas, primarily focussed on infrastructure provision. To a large extent community interaction, whilst unavoidable, was considered secondary to the technical business of running a mine. Over the last several years however, there has been a concerted drive within the sector to change how mines interact with their communities. Most companies have made public commitments to engage on a much more informed basis with affected communities and other stakeholders on matters of mutual concern. A variety of formal and informal consultative processes have been established at the local level, and a growing number of operations are adopting formal community relations systems. The primary business drivers for this enhanced attention to community engagement are a desire to better manage social risks and to achieve competitive advantage through self-regulation, community and employee endorsement, and reduced financial volatility. Progressive companies are adopting a sophisticated array of business systems to ensure their consistent attention and delivery in the social arena.

Publisher: International Conference on Engaging Communities, 14-17 August 2005, Brisbane

CITATION

Harvey, B. & Brereton, D. 2005. Emerging Models of Community Engagement in the Australian Minerals Industry. International Conference on Engaging Communities, 14-17 August 2005, Brisbane

Emerging Models of Community Engagement in the Australian Minerals Industry
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Emerging Models of Community Engagement in the Australian Minerals Industry